THE IRON GIANT EBOOK

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Read "The Iron Giant" by Ted Hughes available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. A mysterious creature stalks the land. Read "The Iron Giant" by Ted Hughes available from Rakuten Kobo. A mysterious creature stalks the land, eating barbed wire and devouring tractors and plows. The farmers are mystified - and ciofreedopadkin.cf then they glimpse him in the night: the Iron Giant, taller than a house, with glowing headlight eyes and an insa.


The Iron Giant Ebook

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Editorial Reviews. ciofreedopadkin.cf Review. A huge, mysterious iron man stands at the top of a cliff, eBooks > Literature & Fiction > Classics; # in site Store > site eBooks > Children's eBooks > Literature & Fiction > Popular Culture. Editorial Reviews. Review. "'Reckoned one of the greatest of modern fairy tales.' Observer In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading. Back. The Iron Giant ยท Ted Hughes. And then they glimpse him in the night: the Iron Giant, taller than a house, with glowing headlight eyes What they do know is that the Iron Giant must be stopped.

They super changed it in the movie. So which did you like better? The movie or the book? The book. Very cool. What are you reading next?

I will read My Dead Girlfriend. Good choice. The Essential Calvin and Hobbes. Well, congratulations on your big finish. Thank you. You are welcome. Ted Hughes, this is a great book! I am sure Sylvia Plath will be glad to hear it? Ted's dead girlfriend. Oh, I see.

You I love. You me too.

View all 3 comments. May 01, Catherine McDonald added it. Set in a rural town, a town where a small boy called Hogarth goes fishing in the local stream only to come across an Iron Man.

He forms a relationship with the Iron Man and he must save him from the adults. The fact that when he does tell the grown-ups that they believe him and are unsure what to do really makes this story thrilling for children as they realise they are on an even footing with the adults. Children love this book as it has adventure, mystery and explores different relationships. I think it is an excellent book to use as a stimulus in science or to create cross curricular links when reading it in literacy.

You can look at the properties of different materials. Plan an experiment to test the strength of different materials. A lot of silhouette illustrations are used in the book so you can cross over with light and shadows in science and get the children to make their own shadow robot puppets. For ICT you could make a stop motion animation based on the story.

The book is also an excellent basis for looking at harmony within the world and how peace is created. The Iron Man wants to bring peace to the world and so possibly in Year 6, you can look at what war does and how to create peace in the world. It could be the basis in a debate possibly for PHSE or even a philosophy lesson where the answer may not be possible to find. Apr 26, Suad Shamma rated it really liked it Shelves: I was thrilled when I got this copy of The Iron Man from my husband.

I've always loved the movie The Iron Giant, and have it almost memorized in its entirety! I never knew that it was based on a book, nor that it was a book written by Ted Hughes! I shamefully admit that this was my first Ted Hughes book, and although I enjoyed it, it was close to nothing like the movie.

That put me off for many reasons, but the biggest being that I was reading it with the movie playing in my head, which was prob I was thrilled when I got this copy of The Iron Man from my husband. That put me off for many reasons, but the biggest being that I was reading it with the movie playing in my head, which was probably my mistake.

The Iron Man was more of a victim-turned-hero in this book than he was made to be in the movie, and the fighting scene at the end against the big black dragon from space was insanely brilliant.

I thoroughly enjoyed it and the cleverness behind it. I would recommend to all who decide to read this book and have watched the film adaptation beforehand to think of it as completely independent from the movie.

Otherwise, you will find yourself disappointed, as did I. I suspect few come to this book without having first seen the film adaptation called The Iron Giant , the Warner Brothers animation directed by Brad Bird and co-written by him. The book is wonderful but perhaps not a masterpiece. Let us deal first with the book, because I think it is necessary and pleasurable to return to the film. The charm of the book stems from the central idea o I suspect few come to this book without having first seen the film adaptation called The Iron Giant , the Warner Brothers animation directed by Brad Bird and co-written by him.

The charm of the book stems from the central idea of the impact caused by the arrival on Earth of a giant mechanical man. He can deconstruct then reconstruct himself by way of his component parts being handily equipped with homing devices so that they can link up with each other. Simply, the metal man falls down a cliff into the sea, the local famers relax until he returns and starts eating their tractors, so they build a big pit to trap him.

When the giant falls in they fill it with earth. The story is in five parts. Or to give the story its proper subtitle: This is the other important element of the charm of The Iron Man. The story reads like it is being told to wide-eyed children, sitting enthralled. A child as we know does not always require complete logic and the story of a big metal man from space is a gripping one.

So is his developing friendship with Hogarth. The whole dragon sequence is, of course, fantastic in the literal sense but also, very appealing to small children.

While remaining true to the spirit of the book, the animated film The Iron Giant improves the story by giving it a better narrative arc and locating the tale very specifically in a s cold war environment, when the organs of authority government, security agencies, the army were perhaps more respected than they are now, certainly powerful, but nevertheless susceptible to paranoia and suspicion.

A big metal machine is just the thing to disturb their shaky equilibrium. The threat to the iron giant does not come externally but arises from the paranoia of the time - where does the creature come from?

Is it made by the Russians? The Chinese? It represents an unknown danger: Hogarth understands the nature of the giant and that he is friendly: In the film Hogarth, has a single mother and he is befriended by the beatnik sculptor who runs the scrap yard, both uncomfortable types in the s. The sculptor in particular with his art, coffee and penchant for jazz represents a disturbing anti-establishment perspective. The soundtrack is superb too. In this way the story remains integrated and coherent, while maintaining faith with the source material: Read the book and see the film!

View all 4 comments. And I think the excellence of the film completely overshadowed this book in my readings. Hughes has a simple, lyrical style that works for younger readers. And he divides the chapters into episodes to make it easily digestible.

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However, the story itself has no real depth of character, and prefers to stay detached in describing the realm of the fantastic. We never really see Hogarth and the Giant become friends. And the appearance of the space dragon is an interesting trickster fairytale spin, but it doesn't fit organically with the previous episodes of the Iron Giant on Earth. If I hadn't watched the movie I would probably be more forgiving, because the story has its charms. But when compared to the animated classic, The Iron Giant seems smaller in comparison.

Apr 30, Pink rated it liked it. For a children's book which isn't my favourite genre to read as an adult this was pretty good. The prose is quite poetic and the story is engaging, both on the surface and at a deeper level. One to read with children, while still getting enjoyment yourself. Jun 10, Rhian Loxley rated it it was amazing.

I am about to start reading the Iron man with my year three class, and I cannot wait. Having had the pleasure and vivid memories of being read this story by one of my own teachers when I was at school.

I was a little apprehensive as to whether I would enjoy reading this book again, now that i am an adult. I need not have worried, Ted Hughes' writing is magical and this story was made to be read aloud.

In fact I have enjoyed reading it so much, that over the half term holiday I read the story alo I am about to start reading the Iron man with my year three class, and I cannot wait. In fact I have enjoyed reading it so much, that over the half term holiday I read the story aloud to my partner on a long car journey to Wales. The suspense and the visual imagery that builds as you read, really is spectacular.

Having done my research, I am now aware of how Hughes came to write the Iron Man and it did not surprise me that the Iron Man was a story that Hughes made up over the course of five nights of storytelling to his children.

After every part of the story he would go to his study and write it up just as he had told it. With this in mind it makes complete sense that the story reads aloud with such great ease and expression. From this story I will be doing a series of 3 lessons this week. My first lesson will be about forming opinions based upon the theme of recycling. On Tuesday we will be building character portraits, based upon the first chapter we will observe how our visualisations of the Iron Man progress as the story unfolds.

Wednesday will see us doing a picture the author activity where we find out about Ted Hughes and make links between our knowledge of how and why he wrote the story and his use of pace and language. Next week we will be looking at character empathy and comparing characters from different stories as we are currently reading the BFG as our shared reading book. I would recommend this story as both a great book for reading for pleasure and also as a book to base a series of lessons on.

Jan 07, Gareth Roberts rated it it was amazing.

The Iron Man by Ted Hughes is a book that I came across due to the year four class I was placed in using the book for the basis of their Autumn terms literacy lessons. The Iron Man is a third person account of a metal eating iron giant who falls from space to impact on Hogarth's and the rest of the village's lives.

The book was used successfully as the basis for a combination of literacy lessons due to the authors use of many literary devices which the class were required to learn that term.

It The Iron Man by Ted Hughes is a book that I came across due to the year four class I was placed in using the book for the basis of their Autumn terms literacy lessons. It allowed the children to see how using devices such as metaphors, similes, climax and onomatopoeia could be used in their writing to make it more interesting to the reader. As well its use as being an example of creative writing, the Iron Man was used to teach other forms of writing such as newspaper reports, letter writing and persuasive argument.

As the Iron Man is a short novel, the children were able to unpick the various themes within the book. The chapters are relatively short and all end with a climax, making the reader want to read on and the children begging for more.

I would recommend all primary teachers read the Iron Man as it can be very useful in the classroom.

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It is suitable for KS1 and KS2 with different themes having greater relevance for difference age groups. Whilst The Iron Man is a wonderfully descriptive and poetic story there is a real sense of rhythm to Hughes' words which is lovely the story itself seems to be composed of two separate halves. In the first half, we are introduced to the Iron Man, his fondness for eating anything steel and disrupting the farmers, etc.

I feel Hughes could have really branched out his story after chapter three but instead he creates an entirely unrelated scenario which doesn't really add anything to the book.

I didn't invest emotionally with the Iron Man but I think the main reason for this is the length of the story and left me feeling 'meh'. It's a nice easy read to while away an hour but lacks any emotional punch to become a favourite. First let me say that I will not accept this as SF. It's a great story, a parable, a fable, a fantasy And what about all that consumption; where is the matter going? Second, I coulda sworn that I read it before. I know I enjoyed the movie.

And of course the movie is very different though also quite good. But I thought I read the story, and yet almost nothing rings a bell. In any case, this oversized, artistically designed edition g First let me say that I will not accept this as SF. I don't particularly care for this kind of art, speaking for myself, but here it's both effective and appropriate.

Highly recommended.

Jul 10, Sarfraz rated it really liked it. The Iron Man book is one of the most remembered books from my childhood. The adventure starts with an immediate introduction of the Iron Man, giving great detail in his appearance. The suspense quickly builds up as the Iron Man falls down the cliff and in to little pieces. The body parts then start to reassemble, one by one until the Iron Man is complete.

A little boy named Hogarth appears on the scene, fishing in a stream before he is startled by the Iron Man. Hogarth runs home to raise the alar The Iron Man book is one of the most remembered books from my childhood.

Hogarth runs home to raise the alarm and with the help of the adults, the Iron Man is buried alive. But when danger approaches and the Earth is threatened, it is the Iron Man who comes to the humans aid.

The Iron Man, from the beginning, intrigues the imagination of children with statements like "how far had he walked? The vocabulary is simple yet effective with an informative writing style. The book can be read to a class; it can therefore be enjoyed by children of all ages whether they are 5 years old or 9.

The Iron Man can lead on to further related activities depending on the age group of the children, for example: Aug 17, George K. Feb 28, Selene rated it really liked it. Feb 28, Lenalovesbooks rated it really liked it. View 1 comment. It's ok, but the movie is actually better. More consistent in tonality and it makes more sense. I mean I get that a children's book like this is going to involve suspension of disbelief but the iron giant starts speaking human language at the end, seemingly out of nowhere, with no explanation to why he can all of a sudden talk and why he wasn't talking before.

Apr 29, Danny rated it really liked it Shelves: A good read to Miss Seven for a much longer than usual bedtime story. First time reading this little classic. Will check out the film next. I remember this book as being magic. I didn't like that as much. I'm doing a children's lit module this next semester, so I dug out a lot of "childhood classics" or books I adored as a kid to reread, or at least glance at.

The back calls it a modern fairytale, which is true.

It's purely fantastical, with a big iron man and a bit space-drag I remember this book as being magic. It's purely fantastical, with a big iron man and a bit space-dragon-bat-thing. I liked the way it was told, but I think I also found it a little creepy when I was younger. Also, as an adult, the two halves of the story fit a little oddly -- in the first half, the Iron Man is silent and a menace.

In the second half, he becomes this heroic clever figure. Maybe it's something you need to be a child to accept. The moral at the end is simple and nice enough, but kind of out of the blue. Still, I thought it was magic as a child and I'll give it the rating the child would have given it.

Aug 10, Deb Readerbuzz Nance rated it really liked it Shelves: One day, an Iron Giant arrives on earth. He eats barbed wire and tractors and plows, causing problems for the farmers. Finally, the farmers devise a trap for the Iron Giant and they successfully capture him. Then an even more terrible creature arrives from space and the Iron Giant must come to the rescue.

If they fed it, how could they ever satisfy it? It would never be full, and every new day it would be as hungry as ever.

How can you feed a beast the size of Australia? Australia is a vast land, all the countries of Europe will fit easily into Australia. No, they would not feed it. Mar 18, Bryony Wells rated it it was amazing.

It took me the entire duration of the book to realise how much I loved it. Perfect for a lower ks2 class, Ted Hughes cleverly uses his beautiful poetic language to challenge our thoughts, and eventually, challenge our morals.

Fantastic and bizarre. Mar 11, Sarah rated it it was amazing. I found a version of this in a charity shop with fabulous illustrations. I had forgotten how wonderfully sublime some of the language is and, of course, the timely and pertinent message of hope and peace. A delightful revisit to an old, forgotten favourite.

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Sep 28, Andrei Stoian rated it liked it Shelves: Romanian review: English review: I haven't seen the movie so far, although it's very famous, but I'll definitely watch it tonight. I read much better children's books which caused me much more feelings, had much profound themes and made me think about many things, but this book was not bad overall.

There was nothing really impressive about this book, indeed, neither the author's style nor his creativity were impressive, it was a simple and short story about peace in the world.

It was a little childish, there were some unrealistic things I'm not talking about the science fiction elements, but about some holes in the logic regarding people's decisions , but it had a certain charm and it is probably more catchy for children, it certainly delighted the childhood of many. I will conclude by simply saying that I liked it, no more, no less, if I recommend it, well, I read it on the Internet and as I said above, it is short, so you've got nothing to lose if you read it, a physical edition would probably be a nice gift for a child's birthday or for a Christmas present, the fact that it was labeled as a "classic of children literature" made me read it and I can not say I regret it.

There are better books in this genre, as I said above, but it is perfect as a break between serious readings. Aug 18, Baysal rated it really liked it.

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The Iron Giant

A mysterious creature stalks the land, eating barbed wire and devouring tractors and plows. The farmers are mystified - and afraid. And then they glimpse him in the night: Where has he come from? Nobody knows. How was he made? What they do know is that the Iron Giant must be stopped. But the real threat hovers above, darkening the sky with its scaly wings: And suddenly, the world needs a hero - a giant hero - like never before First published in , Ted Hughes's classic tale is a powerful tribute to peace on earth - and in all the universe.Proud of myself.

We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. The book is wonderful but perhaps not a masterpiece. The First Beaver. The Iron Man 2 books. Go, go, go! Rain Forest Rampage. Never before has the phrase 'You are who you choose to be' and the robotic 'Superman' evoked such a pitiful flurry of tears in that of a hard-faced infant who, as I'm rightfully reminded of by my Dad, refused to see another film for months afterwards due to the sheer trauma and, ironically, missed the concluding scene because she was too upset to continue watching it.

Bot Wars.