CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS BOOK

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Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is a children's book written by Judi Barrett and illustrated by Ron Barrett. It was first published in by the Simon. Judi Barrett is the author of many beloved books for children, including the bestselling Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs, Pickles to Pittsburgh, Animals Should. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The beloved, bestselling tale of edible weathe.


Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs Book

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Zany food-as-weather tale full of humor, great drawings. Read Common Sense Media's Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs review, age rating, and parents. Cloudy with a chance of meatballs. Nicole Goldsand. Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs. Büşra A. First lines of Children's books by gaillovely. Plot Summary. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs, by Judi Barrett and Illustrated by Ron Barrett is a well known children's storybook. It has sold over three.

The absurdity and silliness in this story make it a joy to read and the combining of two familiar concepts, food and weather, into one story are sure to stoke the imagination.

Kids of this age group will love the fanciful, over the top, giant ideas presented in this book. About This Book Here's another wonderfully written and illustrated story by the Barrett team. Receiving a place on the prestigious New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books of the Year list, this book skillfully and subtly blends funny storytelling and full-color illustrations with a very real twist about how weather can affect people's environments.

Life in the wonderful town of ChewandSwallow is great: Some of its citizens even say it's downright delicious! Instead of snow, wind, or rain, they get a different kind of weather that falls from the sky three times a day: The only bad part about living in ChewandSwallow is that the people don't get their choice of what they'd like to fall from the sky: But no one is too worried about the weather, until it takes a turn for the worse — the portions of food get larger and larger and fall faster and faster, until everyone in the town fears for their lives.

They all need to think of a plan, and they need one fast! With teamwork, smarts, and some extra-large bagels, Chewandswallow residents are able to save themselves from the torrential weather. A cheerful approach to gearing up for a science lesson or just for reading aloud, this book makes food and weather fun. A good review and I agree that it is a good starting point for a weather discussion, especially because of the great terms used in the story.

View 1 comment. Mar 16, Chris rated it it was amazing Shelves: My daughter came home all excited about reading this book in school today.

My son then chimed in and I soon had two children dancing around my kitchen telling me all about this book and laughing hysterically. I supposed I should read it myself before I recommend it, but my children definately gave it "two thumbs up"! Mar 15, Petra X rated it it was amazing Shelves: I loved this book. The artwork is wonderful and the way the text is so dry and matter-of-fact is so funny.

I can't wait to see the film. When a breakfast mishap ends with pancake all over Henry's face, Grandpa is inspired to tell the story of the small town of Chewandswallow located "Across an ocean, over lots of huge bumpy mountains, across three hot deserts, and one smaller ocean" , where all of the residents' food needs were once provided for by the local weather.

Whether it was raining soup or snowing mashed potatoes, there was always plenty to eat. But as the weather became more and more extreme - nothing but stinky gorgonz When a breakfast mishap ends with pancake all over Henry's face, Grandpa is inspired to tell the story of the small town of Chewandswallow located "Across an ocean, over lots of huge bumpy mountains, across three hot deserts, and one smaller ocean" , where all of the residents' food needs were once provided for by the local weather.

But as the weather became more and more extreme - nothing but stinky gorgonzola cheese one day, destructive giant meatballs that damaged homes another - the residents slowly began to realize that they would have to abandon their town Originally published in , this imaginative picture-book reminded me a bit of Alan Stamaty's Who Needs Donuts?

In fact, Ron Barrett's detailed engraving-style illustrations were very reminiscent of Stamaty's artwork. That association added to my enjoyment of Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs , although I have to admit that, generally speaking, I may have missed the boat on this one. I never read this book as a child, and although I believe young readers will appreciate its humorous take on weather gone wild, I wasn't quite as impressed as I expected to be, given its status as a perennial picture-book favorite.

Still, I'm glad it was one of this month's selections, over in the Picture-Book Club to which I belong, even if it wasn't quite my cup of tea! Mar 27, Crystal Marcos rated it it was amazing. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs is one of my favorite books. I read it again tonight and realized it is now 32 years old.

It could have been written yesterday. It has stood the test of time. I believe years from now I will still have the same thoughts. This book holds a special place in my heart because it is a book I shared with my 2 sisters and 2 brothers.

I think most little boys and girls love stories in the larger-than-life category and of course it helps that it has to do with food. Who Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs is one of my favorite books.

Who doesn't love food? The title of this book is just perfect to explain what the book is about. Food and the weather. I get lost in the illustrations everytime I read the book. I have to pause and look at all the fun little details. I think it was a great idea to start and end the book in black and white and to make grandpa's story section color. It adds extra charm to the book. I didn't know this husband and wife team also did two other books besides the sequel Pickles To Pittsburgh until tonight.

I am excited to read them. Feb 02, zcb rated it it was amazing. We read to our children often when they were little, 20 some years ago. We picked this one up by chance, and I have to say, from the moment we first opened the pages it has stuck with not just me, but them as well.

What a fabulously creative book, one that opened little imaginations wide. Wonderful prose, and illustrations that took that imagination for a ride. It was fairly disappointing. Do yourself and your chil We read to our children often when they were little, 20 some years ago.

Do yourself and your children a favor and read this original book, rather than the movie book, it does not compare. Dec 25, Jess rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is my favorite picture book.

Even as a teenager, I'd hunt his book up from time to time to make sure I'd memorized all the lines correctly. This story reads exactly like all stories told by your grandfather are supposed to. The ones where, as a kid, you keep saying 'really! Feb 23, Vicki rated it really liked it Shelves: Very cute story with a different story inside.

I can see why the kids like it. It is yummy! Oct 21, J. Keely rated it it was ok Shelves: This book always made me a bit queasy. Jul 10, Vaishali rated it really liked it Shelves: You know you're in a wealthy society when kids read about the sky raining food.

Aside from this obnoxious premise, a highly creative, surprising story. Kudos to Barrett for including composting.

Mar 17, Carl Koch rated it it was amazing. The story is narrated by grandpa to his grandkids.

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

He tells of a far off land called Chewandswallow. There all the weather is food. It snows mashed potatoes, rains soup, and accounts for the townspeople's three meals of the day. Life in Chewandswallow is good until the weather takes a turn for the worst. The portions are getting bigger and so is the food.

It finally gets so bad the the townspeople have to make boats out of stale bread a I read "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs" by Judi Barrett. It finally gets so bad the the townspeople have to make boats out of stale bread and leave the island for good. No one knows what became of Chewandswallow, but nobody dares to go back! Grandpa is the main character. He is kind, gentle, and a very good storyteller. The story takes place in the town of Chewandswallow. It is a town on a small island. There is no direct time period, but it seems relative to current time.

I would recommend it to any reader because it has a good message, is a quick read, and has a simple vocabulary. The incorporation of pictures also really helps bring the story to life. May 28, Sarah Sammis rated it it was amazing Shelves: I apologize for the delay. I really don't know where the time as gone!

The book has a framing story that begins with a mishap during breakfast. The grandfather is inspired and tells the children about a place called Chewandswallow where the weather brings food three times a day. Except near the end of the town's existence, the food gets too big and s Back in January I wrote a review of the film version of Cloud with a Chance of Meatballs and I promised a longer review of the book by Judi Barrett.

Except near the end of the town's existence, the food gets too big and starts to be a threat to the well-being of the townspeople. As the story is presented as a tall tale, there's no need to explain the mechanics behind the food weather or the sudden increase in the foods' size.

Without that framing story I would have found the book annoying. Although the illustration style of the book is very clearly a product of the late s, the film manages to recreate many of the iconic scenes though with different circumstances behind them.

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I liked seeing that connection between book and film even though they are otherwise so very different. A great story - tells not only a fascinating tall tale about the town of Chewandswallow, but also talks about the closeness of extended family. Who doesn't love a story about Grandpa's tall tales? Our oldest loves this tale and we've read it a couple of times. Jun 06, Karol rated it it was amazing Shelves: My son 10 years old was so excited when I brought this book home from the library to read and discuss with an online group.

It is an excellent story, very imaginative. I loved the setting - a grandfather telling his grandchildren a tall tale that kept their imaginations goi My son 10 years old was so excited when I brought this book home from the library to read and discuss with an online group. They then set sail and off to a new, permanent land. Now safe from the hazards presented by the raining meals, the townsfolk settle into their new home which the book never mentioned by name.

Though life is now much more peaceful, now that nobody fears of getting hit by a hamburger again, the townsfolk are forced to the new weather, which only rains rain and snows snow. The place to get food from is a store and not the sky including malls and grocery stores.

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

Food often has to be cooked prior to serving as opposed to any meats which came down "pre-cooked" back at Chewandswallow. Everyone lives happily ever after. Nobody ever got hit by a hamburger again nor ever again dared to go back to Chewandswallow to find out what happened to it.

They were too afraid. Now cutting back to the grandchildren, as the grandfather finishes the bedtime story, the granddaughter, in first-person narration, then mentions that she and Henry were still awake; awake until the very end of Grandpa's story.

The following morning, the grandfather's grandchildren awaken to discover snowfall.

After bundling up and hurrying outside to play, the granddaughter describes how the sun looks like a pat of butter and the snow like mashed potatoes. She imagines that the sun as butter and the snow as mashed potatoes is like the food in the weather at Chewandswallow from the story that Grandpa had told her and Henry the night before. Because it looks like that, she and Henry could almost smell mashed potatoes. Sequels[ edit ] The follow up to the story, Pickles to Pittsburgh, tells of the kids receiving a postcard from their grandfather, who claims to be visiting the ruins of what was once the fabled town of Chewandswallow.

The kids then go to sleep and dream that they are there with him, helping to rebuild the post-apocalyptic landscape and restore it to where it is livable again, as well as giving the massive amounts of food away to poverty-stricken developing nations and homeless shelters around the world.

This proves to be difficult, as there could be more food storms on the way. It details a dream Grandpa had about the first manned expedition to Mars, where Martian society is being overrun by daily storms of pies. A new cast of characters were created for plot development, while the synopsis was changed from food falling from skies from meteorology to being made from a machine.

Bill Hader and Anna Faris provided the voices of the two lead characters. Hader voices Flint Lockwood, "a young inventor who dreams of creating something that will improve everyone's life.

Originally the phenomenon was limited to Swallow Falls, but overuse of the machine causes it to malfunction and the food weather taking a turn for the worse, as well as spreading it across the world.

At first sight, the story may seem to only be about a mysterious and magical town with odd weather patterns where food falls from the sky. However, when inspected more closely, it is philosophically rich and entertains multiple questions about freedom, safety, migration, and adaptation. In our current world, this would be an incredible solution to one of our biggest problems: world hunger. But it appears that nothing comes without consequence: having food fall from the sky three times a day for breakfast, lunch, and dinner limits the people in the town of Chewandswallow in various ways.

Therefore, most of this part of the discussion involves coming up with the pros and cons of having food fall from the sky and asking the children what parts about having food fall from the sky they would like and dislike. The pros seem to be more apparent from the book than the cons, so more time should be allotted to challenging the children to find some possible cons of the situation.

Having food always fall from the sky could have many great things come from it. The townspeople seem to never go hungry. People can walk outside with their plates and silverware and just wait to get food, rather than spend a large portion of their time preparing meals.

Maybe people can use this extra time and money to have more fun with friends and download more things that they want.

Perhaps not being able to choose what they want to eat for their meals may be frustrating for the townspeople. What if people have allergies to certain foods so that they have to miss out on certain meals? It would be good to focus on how the townspeople may be limited in what they can eat, or in other words, how they have limited control over what they eat.

It rains things such as soup and juice. Additionally, not everyone wakes up at the same time, so if people wake up too late, they might miss meals. Could this become troublesome? Finally, people could become hungry between meals. How many people enjoy eating leftovers? Ultimately, this discussion of weighing the pros and cons can be related to a bigger theme of safety versus freedom. When the weather takes a turn for the worse, the people of Chewandswallow find the food as more of a curse than a blessing and are tasked with a difficult decision of leaving their homeland.

This crisis brings up some good questions about migration: Is it voluntary or involuntary and what are the causes that influence a group of people to resituate themselves? In order to promote discussion on moving, ask the children if they have ever moved or know someone who has.A huge pancake has fallen on the school, and meatballs are damaging houses. People become sneezing and running to avoid the tomatoes which brought seeds and pulp everywhere. They thought hamburgers falling from the sky was amazing.

However, life for the townspeople of Chewandswallow was delicious. I highly recommend this book to anyone of any age. Rating details. What parents need to know Parents need to know that Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is the first books in a series about crazy food events in the sky. Some of its citizens even say it's downright delicious! The only bad part about living in ChewandSwallow is that the people don't get their choice of what they'd like to fall from the sky: Deciding to do the latter, the citizens ultimately find another home and become accustomed to downloading food from supermarkets, storing their comestibles in refrigerators, and having rain and snow fall from the sky.